Progression of Principles 
 
*Based on the P.o.P. model from http://www.moneylessmanifesto.org/book/the-pop-model/ 
  
General Concept: Rather than stictly enforced utopian ideological purity, we here outline a 
series of checkpoints along multiple continuums. Steps in the various progressions may be 
skipped. It may not be possible to reach the ideal in each category, but this outlines the 
potential locations we might inhabit, and what to work toward. 
  
Example: Category – ‘Transport’ *Parentheticals assume progression from “100% global 
monetary economy” to 100% local gift economy” as an overarching goal, under which the 
Transport category falls. This goal is only for example purposes, and may differ from the 
group’s actual goals. 
1.(100% local gift economy*): Walking barefoot, connecting with the earth beneath my 
feet. 
2.Brain-tanned moccasins 
3.Walking in shoes I made myself (or were unconditionally gifted to me) from local 
materials. 
4.Walking in shoes I bartered for, which were made from local materials. 
5.Maker-shop Bamboo bicycle. 
6.Walking in trainers made in a Chinese factory.  
7.Cycling on an industrial scale bicycle. 
8.(100% global monetary economy*): Driving a hybrid 
car.examples:http://www.bamboobike.org/ 
  
Land and Location  
Land (POP) 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered): IPC Network. Multiple IPC Enclave/Exclave. 
Semi-nomadic open travel between IPC nodes. 
2.IPC Enclave. Small amount of ‘owned’ land bordering on wilderness. 
3.Freeganism, urban foraging.  Hunting/fishing. 
4.Rural-Farm. Food grown on land owned through intensive/farm agriculture. 
5.Urban-Suburban Locavore. Food purchased locally. 
6.{progression checkpoint}: This is a placeholder. The number of checkpoints is not 
fixed. 
7.(100% of food purchased) City. Purchasing food that’s been imported from around the 
globe. 
  
Geography (POP) 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered): IPC Network. Multiple IPC Enclave/Exclave. 
Semi-nomadic open travel between IPC nodes. 
2.IPC Enclave. Small amount of ‘owned’ land bordering on wilderness. 
3.Freeganism, urban foraging.  Hunting/fishing. 
4.Rural-Farm. Food grown on land owned through intensive/farm agriculture. 
5.Urban-Suburban Locavore. Food purchased locally. 
6.{progression checkpoint}: This is a placeholder. The number of checkpoints is not 
fixed. 
7.(100% of food purchased) City. Purchasing food that’s been imported from around the 
globe. 
  
Location(s) (POP) (specific examples fitting land and geography above) 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered):  
2.{progression checkpoint}: This is a placeholder. The number of checkpoints is not 
fixed. 
3.{progression checkpoint}: This is a placeholder. The number of checkpoints is not 
fixed. 
4.(100% of food purchased)  
  
Notes / Thoughts / Questions 
Suggested locations: Maine, PNW 
 
Shelter 
Concepts POP 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered): Nomadic 
2.Seasonal camps. 
3.Reclaimed Structures. 
4.Human construction, natural materials. 
5.Human construction, salvage materials. 
6.Industrial construction, nsedentary atural materials. 
7.Industrial construction, salvage materials. 
8.(100% of food purchased)  Industrial construction, industrial materials 
  
Specific Examples 
1.(100% natural and mobile):  
2.Yurt 
3.Cob, cordwood, straw bale 
4.Reclaimed Structures. 
5.Existing houses. 
6.(100% new, built, and sedentary) Industrially produced structures built from imported 
materials. 
 
Additional 
1.Potential for avoiding building codes (when practical, cuts down on fees and taxes) 
a.*These vary widely by jurisdiction 
b.Total size exemption (often 100, 120, or 200 sq. ft.) 
c.Height limitation (10 feet in some cases) 
d.”Farm building” 
e.Mobile 
f.”Temporary Structures” 
g.Outside City Limits 
2. 
a.Tiny Houses 
b.”We the Tiny House People” [documentary] http://youtu.be/lDcVrVA4bSQ 
c.Mobile 
i.Tiny house built on trailer by 16 year old: 

ii.Floating 
1.Boats 
2.55 gallong drum platforms 
http://rollingbarge.com/portfolio-items/old-school-shots/ 
3.Concrete float dock platforms 
d. 
e.Temporary Structures (legal definition examples http://bit.ly/QwU2hA ) 
3.Building Materials 
a.Low-Cost / Free / Reclaimed / Recycled 
i.Pallets http://youtu.be/3M2j5SIPC6U 
ii.Shipping Containers 
iii.Earth-sheltered 
b.Natural 
c.Straw bale 
 
4.Reclaimed Structures 
a.Mid-century modern motels on relatively desolate old highways — particularly 
those with multiple separate smallish buildings. 
b. 
c.Barns 
 
Systems (shelters sub-topic) 
1.Water 
a.Rain Catchment 
b.Well 
2.Waste 
a.Composting 
Electricity (?) 
●Solar 
●Wind 
●Micro-hydro 
●None 
 
Heating/Cooling 
●Thermal mass 
● 
● 
 
Food (with respect to food grown indoors only) 
● 
● 
 
● 
 
 
Food Matters 
Goal: Nutritional needs met by hunting and gathering 
Reality (transitional): quasi-gathering via horticulture/permaculture is likely necessary due to 
land access/use restrictions and low wildlife populations due to anthropogenic degredation 
of habitat. 
  
Limitations: Zero grain agriculture 
  
Further considerations… 
  
Food is (or can/should be) one of the most enjoyable things in life. 
  
Aesthetic goal: Maximum foodie(ism) with minimal neolithic influence. Some sort of 
Epicureanism? 
 
I like a lot of what Nick Weston is doing over at http://www.huntergathercook.com/ 
  
Carrying Capacity: A landbase can only support a certain number of humans (or other 
predators for that matter) at any given time. The capacity of the land to support our numbers 
will be a determinant of total population of the IC. 
  
Hunting Tools/Techniques: A diverse range of hunting methods will be best to ensure a 
reliable food supply in various conditions and to comply with state hunting regulations. Big 
game is the top priority when available, and should be harvested with whatever tools and 
techniques the community can offer. While tools/weapons such as knives, bows, spears, 
axes, atlatl, etc. can be handmade from materials sourced from the land, they require great 
skill and knowledge to build and use. Thus, there will be phases when durable, high quality 
industrially produced tools/weapons including firearms must be used for the sake of 
maintaining an adequate food supply. 
  
Preparation of Food: Fermentation, drying and smoking are methods that should be used for 
the food acquired that cannot be eaten fresh. It also ensures that there’s backup readily 
available. 
  
— 
  
Given mentioned human disturbances, folks involved may consider undertaking conservation 
or restoration ecology projects to increase species-targeted biodiversity for improved 
hunting and trapping abilities (and for the sake of biodiversity per se.)  
  
Links: 
http://rule-303.blogspot.se/ 
  
-Recommended Reading- 
  
Basic Butchering of Livestock & Game by John J. Mettler 
Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing by Michael Ruhlman 
 
 
Animal 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered): Wild animals hunted for food. 
2.Feral domesticates. 
3.Husbandry. Animals domesticated, fed, controlled, killed, eaten. 
4.{progression checkpoint}: This is a placeholder. The number of checkpoints is not 
fixed. 
5.(100% of food purchased) Industrially produced animals fed non-appropriate diet in 
CAFOs 
  
examples 
Semi-feral furry pigs – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mangalitsa 
White-Tailed deer – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer 
Semi-feral sheep – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Ronaldsay_%28sheep%29 
Various rodents and lagomorphs 
Pheasant, grouse, quail, bobwhite, dove 
Cold-hardy chicken? – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chantecler_%28chicken%29 
  
  
2.  
3.Salvage.  
4.No electricity.  
5.No oil. 
6.(100% of food purchased) Petro-Techno-Industrial. Planes, trains, and… 
  
Technology 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered): Stone Age. 
2.Iron Age. All tools made and rebuildable with no external inputs. Wood-fired metal 
smelting, etc. 
3.Salvage. Upcycle/transform ubiquitous remnants of industrial civ. 
4.No electricity.  
5.No oil. 
6.(100% of food purchased) Petro-Industrial Civilization. 
 
(Appropriate technology discussion Extent of acceptance, avoidance, limitations..? 
  
  
Premise: The promise that technology saves time and improves lives has largely proven 
false. Under spectaclized capitalism, any potential time saved is always filled with more work 
for the promise of more technology that will eventually enable more time. 
  
Premise: Technology is partially responsible for the evolution of humans. The paleolithic is 
defined by stone tool use. 
  
These somewhat conflicting premises must be reconciled. The promise of technology can 
only be realized when it is actually truly for really real used to limit ‘work’. We should hold in 
mind a general goal to minimize technology, but also refrain from making a moral judgement 
that all technology is bad. Older technology is not always better technology simply because it 
is older. However, older technology tends to trump modern technology in terms of resource 
efficiency, which should be a priority.) 
  
Energy 
1.(100% of food hunted-gathered): Stone Age. Low-impact intermittent wood burning. 
2.Low Consumption Low-Tech Non-Electric: Passive solar (thermal), physical 
windmills. 
3.Low Consumption Techno-Electric. Solar (photovoltaic), wind, micro-hydro, 
geothermal. 
4.High Consumption Techno-Electric. Solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, nuclear. 
5.Greenwashed Techno-Electric. Fossil fuels are burned in order to build “renewable” 
infrastructure and tech. 
6.(100% of food purchased) Unlimited consumption

CONTACT US

We're probably outside pedaling on the bike generator to keep our internet running. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

©2014-2020 Feralculture

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?